Skip to main content
sripada

Adam’s Peak – Sri Padaya

Sri Pada Mountain is situated in the South West corner of the central mountain region. This corn shaped mountain is 2243 meters high. Devotes from all 4 major religion believe that the sacred foot print belongs to their religion. Buddhists believe that Load Buddha during his third visit to Sri Lanka has placed his foot print on the summit of this sacred mountain, hence this is called “Sripada”. Muslims believe that this is the sacred foot print of Adam and call Adam’s peak. Hindu’s believe that this is the sacred foot print of god Sive where Christians claim it is St. Thomas’s. People from all fore religions climb this mountain with many faiths. Adams peak is also called as “Samanala Kanda” as name is taken from a Buddhist god “Saman”.

The pilgrim season starts from the full moon of Poya day of December and it continues to the Wesak full moon poya day in the month of May. During the other times this region get heavy rain and the road is very wet to climb and it is dangerous to climb this time.

Adams Peak (Sri Pada) , pilgrims climbing the 5200 steps to the summit, Central Highlands of Sri Lanka, Asia. This is a photo of pilgrims climbing the 5200 steps to the summit of Adams Peak (Sri Pada) in the Central Highlands of Sri Lanka. Pilgrims often start at about 2am in order to climb the 5200+ steps to the summit of Adams Peak (Sri Pada) in time to watch the sunrise.

Adams Peak (Sri Pada) , pilgrims climbing the 5200 steps to the summit, Central Highlands of Sri Lanka, Asia. This is a photo of pilgrims climbing the 5200 steps to the summit of Adams Peak (Sri Pada) in the Central Highlands of Sri Lanka. Pilgrims often start at about 2am in order to climb the 5200+ steps to the summit of Adams Peak (Sri Pada) in time to watch the sunrise.

 

There are two ways to reach to the top of mountain, one is the easier path which is going through Hatton and Maskeliya passing “Seetha gangula”. You have to travel 4 miles if you take this path. The second one is more difficult path but it is the most beautiful way to Sripada. This path is located from Kuruwita (which is a small town closer to Ratnapura). If you take this route you have to walk 10 mils to reach to the top of the mountain.

night view

The mount samanala is the best place to view the magnificent scenic views of the central highlands. In the morning the foot of the mountain is surrounded by mist giving the feeling that you are floating. On a clear day you can even see Colombo, Beruwala foul point and the lighthouses. In the morning you can view the beautiful sunrise from East of the mountain this is called “Ira Seewaya”. Early morning devotes gather to see the beautiful sunrise from here.

This is treated as one of the spectacular view of all and must see incident even it is so cold in the morning.

(Source: http://goldensrilanka.com/places-of-sri-lanka/adams-peak-sripada/)

Temple of Tooth

Sri Dalada Maligawa – Temple of the Tooth

The Temple of the Tooth Relic, also known as Sri Dalada Maligawa, is Sri Lanka’s most important Buddhist shrine. It is believed to hold the sacred tooth of the Buddha, which was taken from his remains after his cremation in India and smuggled to Sri Lanka, where it eventually ended up in Kandy. There, a temple was built within the royal palace complex to keep it safe. Both Kandy and the temple (as it is in it) are now listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

The sacred tooth of the Buddhais is kept in the smallest of seven nested golden caskets shaped like a stupa or dagoba, that are kept in an inner shrine inside the temple.

Image result for sacred tooth relic kandy

 

The sacred tooth relic used to leave the temple once a year, during Esala Perahera. It would then go on a 10-day parade with torches, dancers, drummers and elephants. It is now one of the better-known festivals in Asia, and it may be the largest Buddhist celebration in the world.

As many as 100 elephants, dressed in elaborate finery, make their way into town while torches and fire dancers fend off curses. Whip-cracking porters clear the way through the throngs of pilgrims, followed by musicians, jugglers, torch bearers, boy dancers and acrobats, and members of noble families in Ceylonese garb. On the last night, the procession moves from the city to the temple, led by elders in the costumes of the ancient kings of Kandy and lit by handheld candles. The procession flows into the temple compound to encircle the shrine, following the route of the sun in its course across the skies.

Attendance at the Esala Perahera numbers at about a million people. The festival brings today all ranks of Sri Lankan society in a vast throng of devotees and interested onlookers. Because of the national character of the shrine, many Tamil Hindus and mixed-blood Christians take part as an expression of their common cultural heritage. At the festival, the president and leaders of Sri Lanka continue the nationalist Buddhist tradition by taking part in a ceremony in which they dedicate their service to the people in the presence of the sacred relic.

Related image

 

Things you should know when visiting Temple of the Tooth (dress code):

You should take your shoes off and leave them in the shoeroom (a.k.a. cloakroom for shoes).
Wear long loose trousers or a long skirt that covers your legs.
Make sure your shoulders and cleavage are covered.
It’s best not to wear black or other fully dark clothing.
Source: http://wonderfulwanderings.com/temple-of-the-tooth-relic-kandy-sri-lanka/, http://www.sacred-destinations.com/sri-lanka/kandy-temple-of-the-tooth